Oystercatcher

These oystercatchers were scavenging the beach at Rhyl as the tide came in. These rather large waders, with a sharp piercing cry, are quite common in the UK.

oystercatcher 1oystercatcher 2

As we progressed along the beach trying to get closer, the oystercatchers moved at a similar rate to keep their distance, all the while apparently undistracted from their foraging task.

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Redshank

It took a while to identify these waders, a fair number of which were rummaging about the beach at Rhyl. Then sudden inspiration from she who knows more than I do about birds – redshank. Slowly the light dawned – orangey legs, a color once known as red – and parts of legs known as shanks. The name was pretty obvious really.

Of course, they were too nervous to let me get close enough for a really sharp photo with my travel zoom.

Beach scene

You wouldn’t think that shooting almost directly into the afternoon sun about an hour before sunset would produce good results. This shot was taken pointing just below the sun. The effect reminds me of a Roerich painting.

mountains from rhyl beach

Taken from the beach at Rhyl, North Wales, with the Snowdonia mountains in the background.

Herring Gull

I don’t usually pay much attention to the common Herring Gull, as they are pretty plentiful in the UK (although the RSPB says the population is declining and the bird is red-listed). However a splendid sunny day at Conwy and Llandudno in North Wales gave the opportunity to see them up close.

The photograph on the right shows a gull on the nest in strong sun. Chicks were wriggling about underneath her. What I’d never seen before was the tongue hanging out, presumably helping to stay cool, like a dog.

Some of the mottled brown chicks were making their first forays out into the world, watched over by mother, and precariously positioned on a high part of the town walls at Conwy.

herring gull chicks

Conwy sand bank

The patterns of nature often show an incredible beauty, like this sandbank, water and beach in the Conwy estuary, North Wales, that just caught my eye. What sinuous shapes the wind and tides have created. A beautiful sunny day helped.

conwy sand bank

Another Place

One of my favourite places to visit in the North West of England is Crosby Beach, home to Antony Gormley’s Another Place. The beach is studded with statues of a man looking out to sea, and the effect is remarkable.

The statues, beach, sea, skyline and offshore wind farms provide almost infinite possibilities for photography (not forgetting the starlings).

another placeI rather like this one, at telephoto zoom, showing pooled water on the beach, with the windfarm in the background. In between is the deepwater channel where you occasionally see vessels making their way to/from Liverpool. The shadow on the horizon is the hills of North Wales.

The large sandy beach makes a good place to walk, but is not usually appropriate for traditional ‘bucket and spade’ activities as there is usually a fair wind.

And what’s this about wind farms being an eyesore? In the right place they can even add to the natural beauty of a location, which is not really something you can say about a nuclear power station. Yes I’m biased.