The social media dilemma and its consequences

Matthew Wright addresses the important problem of social media and how it reflects our economic system and its (lack of) values.
Fortunately, most blogs I have come across do not show symptoms of the kneejerk insanity of instant response. So maybe the ‘blogosphere’ is one of the more civilised areas of social media?

Matthew Wright

I watched ‘The Social Dilemma’ a few days ago, the Netflix semi-dramatised documentary exposing the business model behind social media, and what it’s doing to world society.

A beautiful picture of Earth from 1.6 million km sunwards. NASA, public domain.

I wasn’t surprised; the social outcomes have been clear for a while. The ‘confirmation bubbles’ to which social media reduces people are a function of the way in which it’s been geared to make money. But the documentary didn’t go far enough. There’s also the nature of social media as a tool for interaction. It’s a limited and distorting caricature of the ways people interact in person, but it’s being used as a substitute for the real thing.

How limited? The documentary looked at the way photo filters are distorting self-image – highlighting the way it’s damaging children, particularly; and at the way ‘likes’ have become a mechanism for validating…

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