Aluna

How do indigenous peoples perceive the world? The remarkable film Aluna gives an idea. But this is no ordinary action film or documentary. Alan Ereira produced a BBC documentary with the Kogi indians in 1990 to transmit their first warning to mankind to change course and become a part of nature again. Why should we listen? To quote the above website:

The Kogi are the last surviving civilization from the world of the Inca and Aztec, and their cities are untouched by our world. The mountain they inhabit is an isolated triangular pyramid rising over 18,000 feet from the sea, the highest coastal mountain on earth. It is on a separate tectonic plate from the Andes, and its unique structure means that it is virtually a miniature version of the planet, with all the world’s climates represented. The mountain is quite literally a micro-cosmos, a mirror of the planet on which every ecological zone is represented and in which most of the plants and animals of the planet can find homes.

Following that first documentary, the Kogi retreated to their mountain village in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia. Their message perhaps had some effect on the Rio 1991 environmental accord, but has apparently been more recently ignored. So they contacted Alan again and asked him to create another film to try to get their message across. The result is Aluna.

This is like no other film. Adjectives such as slow, unclear, rambling come to mind as it meanders through the story of the Kogi, their coming to London to collect a golden thread, their return and the unrolling of the golden thread around the coast that surrounds the mountains in which they live, to help the healing process. Yet it is also fascinating.

Their message is that the earth is dying because of the actions of so-called civilised man, who they call ‘little brother’. We need to stop and change the way we live and perceive the earth.

As the thread unravels between the seven river estuaries in that coastline their message slowly becomes clear. The industrial ports that have been placed at the river mouths, and the mines and related deforestation, are destroying the rivers themselves. What happens in one part of the river changes the whole river. It is a living being.

They fly up into the mountains by helicopter. We see their beautifully neat village. The nearby river is much reduced from what it was. Vegetation is dying because of this and the foreign species such as eucalyptus that have been planted by the government.

Higher up in the mountains the snows are gone and the lakes are drying up. The mountain ecology is dying. On the coast, macaws that used to be there are no more, lagoons are dying. The Kogi’s world is dying.

A scientist from a UK university flies in and confirms that modern ecology is now beginning to understand that the Kogi view of the river is indeed correct. The different parts are indeed interconnected. Upstream is affected by downstream; they are one system.

It is difficult to deny that the Kogi view is indeed correct and our world is slowly dying, bit by bit, generation by generation. Each new generation sees the baseline as what it was when they were children, so the change does not seem so dramatic. But yes, our natural world is dying. Hence all the species extinctions that we are warned about.

We need to change before it is too late. Covid-19 is clearly a warning shot across the bows by nature.

The new world that emerges must take care of nature from thereon and stop this crazy exploitation and destruction of our home.

So don’t watch this film for a great cinematic experience. It is not that, and you may find time drags watching it. But it leaves a mark on your soul, and gives a feel for the way the Kogi holistically see the world. It is haunting, and may lead you and the rest of us to do (or rather be) something quite remarkable.

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